Monthly Archives: February 2017

Stretch Your Startup Dollars

Initial startup costs are some of the biggest expenses a new business owner will have to encounter. Before you turn a profit, there are many parts of the business that need to be covered up front, and entrepreneurs don’t always anticipate some of these expenses.

To reduce your startup costs and stretch your dollars a little farther, follow these tips.

 

Have a budget, and stick to it

A simple way to save money as a new business owner is to set spending and expense limits. However, a surprising number of business owners don’t have a formal budget, said Carissa Reiniger, founder of small business support community Thank You Small Business.

“There is so much power in knowing what is going on in your business, for better or for worse,” Reiniger told Business News Daily. “Managing the finances of my business is not something I naturally enjoy, so I’ve put rules in place to help me stay on track. I advise setting up a standard time every week or month for reviewing and managing your budget.”

Angie Segal, an ActionCOACH business coach, advised entrepreneurs to factor their own salary into the budget as soon as possible.

“When you don’t pay yourself, you take money out of the business elsewhere to cover your own expenses,” Segal said. “Giving yourself a salary forces you to make everything in your budget work.”

Thatcher Spring, CEO of GearLaunch, said entrepreneurs should always do as much as possible with what they have before they add more fixed costs.

“At my company, we only hire when there is too much for the current staff to reasonably accomplish without additional help,” he said. “I’ve also found that hiring less-experienced, smart, adaptable employees, instead of only those that are senior and highly experienced, can help keep salaries under control.”

 

Be flexible

When you created your business plan, you might have envisioned all of the latest office equipment, lavish holiday parties and enough staff to take on big projects. However, not all of those business luxuries are guaranteed.

Office Evolution founder and CEO Mark Hemmeter said small business owners can suffer from a lack of flexibility in their grand plans.

“Your ego and vanity can get in the way,” he said. “You want that car or that perfect sign, but it just isn’t a good fit for the core of the business.

Hemmeter recommended looking into short-term solutions, like using shared office spaces and hiring freelance workers, until you can afford to make long-term commitments such as acquiring private office suites and hiring full-time employees.

Spring added that business owners should always plan for every effort to take longer than expected, whether it’s launching a new website, signing up customers, sourcing new products or hiring employees.

“Make sure you always set aggressive goals, but realize that there will be unexpected terrain on the pathway to success,” he said.

Choose Your Words Closely

It’s not what you say, but how you say it that could determine how successful your crowdfunding campaign is, new research finds.

A study from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago revealed that linguistic style, which is how one speaks, is critically important in crowdfunding campaigns, especially for social entrepreneurs.

The study’s authors found that how a pitch is voiced and worded is much more important for social entrepreneurs than it is for their commercial counterparts.

“Here, we show that the persuasiveness of entrepreneurs’ stylistic expressions is dependent on their category membership – that is, whether they are social or commercial entrepreneurs,” said Annaleena Parhankangas, the study’s lead author and an assistant professor at the University of Illinois Chicago in a statement. For the study, researchers analyzed 656 Kickstarter campaigns between 2013 and 2014. They discovered that linguistic styles that made the campaigns and their founders more understandable and relatable to potential funders boosted the exposure and success of social campaigns. However, linguistic style made little impact for commercial endeavors.

 

“Early-stage entrepreneurs are increasingly involved in the theatrical pitching of their projects to various audiences at forums, such as accelerator demo days, pitch mixers, competitions and online crowdfunding sites,” Parhankangas said. “How they deliver the message matters – and, as a result, it is important to study how entrepreneurs’ language use affects their chances of raising funding.” The study was co-authored by Maija Renko, a UIC associate professor of entrepreneurship. The researchers said style doesn’t matter as much for commercial entrepreneurs. Instead, content is likely to be enough to persuade their audience to invest. While what’s being pitched is more important for commercial entrepreneurs, there are some phrases they can use in their pitches to increase their chances of success. – See more at: http://www.businessnewsdaily.com/5766-kickstarter-phrases-to-use.html#sthash.w1B0hnAc.dpuf

Lending Right for Your Business

So, your company needs money that you currently don’t have. Maybe your business is just taking flight and is still lacking the necessary funds, or perhaps you have high aspirations with low profits at the moment.

If loans are your go-to choice for financing, you’ll need to decide between a traditional bank loan and an alternative lender. For the latter, peer-to-peer (P2P) lending might be a smart option if you’re looking for a smoother, faster borrowing process.

According to Investopedia, P2P lending lets individuals borrow and lend money without an official financial institution as the intermediary. Lenders collect income from interest, usually at a higher cost than with traditional loans, while borrowers access financing they may not have been approved for elsewhere.

“P2P loans can often offer higher approval rates and competitive interest rates — a stellar combination,” said Emily Bartz, a writer at NextAdvisor.com, which provides independent research and comparison tools for financial, tech and business products. “The beauty of P2P lending is that it offers borrowers a more personal experience by avoiding big banks and financial institutions. Plus, borrowers can rest easy knowing that their lender is accredited and provides legitimate loan support.”

Another upside, according to Bartz, is that P2P lending is flexible, allowing borrowers to complete the process in pieces.

A Funding Match Made in Heaven

Equity crowdfunding, a method of raising capital from small-dollar investors implemented by Title III of the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act, came online nearly a year ago. The measure was touted as an alternative way to finance both early-stage and local companies that might have trouble securing a loan or attracting more conventional investors. By its nature, equity crowdfunding is a horizontal endeavor; companies soliciting small investments register with the SEC through an intermediary platform and begin to build capital toward their goal. If they reach that goal, they receive the funding and the investors officially become shareholders. One intermediary platform, GrowthFountain, saw an opportunity to merge the concept of equity crowdfunding with another kind of horizontal institution: the credit union. Credit unions are financial institutions similar to banks, except for one major difference: Credit unions are not for-profit entities, but rather cooperatives. Each account holder in a credit union is a part owner that retains a democratic stake in the institution and receives dividends in the form of more favorable interest rates, whether it’s on deposits or loans. Marrying equity crowdfunding with credit unions was a no-brainer, said Ken Staut, CEO of GrowthFountain.

“When we formed GrowthFountain and thought about crowdfunding, a lightbulb kind of went off over my head,” Staut told Business News Daily. “Our mission has so many similarities with a credit union’s. We’re both focused on people helping people and community development.” The intersection of equity crowdfunding and credit unions After Staut realized equity crowdfunding and credit unions should go together, he reached out to Callahan & Associates, a prominent credit union think tank, to gauge some of the unions’ interest in offering access to GrowthFountain’s equity crowdfunding platform. It turned out interest was immense, Staut said. Although the company is still early in the process, it already has three credit union partners: Digital Credit Union, a top 10 credit union with 620,000 members across 50 states; Massachusetts-based Jeanne D’Arc Credit Union with 85,000 members; and Oregon-based Rivermark Community Credit Union, also with 85,000 members. About a dozen more contracts are in the works, and Staut estimates that when the ink is dry, GrowthFountain’s equity crowdfunding platform will be available to roughly 3 million credit union members nationwide. Each credit union leverages GrowthFountain’s platform, but the branding and imagery is all unique to the credit union that’s offering it to members. The foremost businesses displayed on each site are unique to the geographic region in which the credit union operates as well, meaning members can invest in local companies – maybe even ones they visit and patronize.

Keep You from Getting a Small Business Loan

For many entrepreneurs, a small business loan is an essential way to finance a new business or expand existing operations. However, obtaining funding for your business is no easy task. Here are six barriers that can prevent you from getting the small business loan you need and a few tips on how to avoid these roadblocks. 1. Poor credit history Credit reports are one tool lenders use to determine a borrower’s credibility. If your credit report shows a lack of past diligence in paying back debts, you might be rejected when applying for a loan. Paul Steck, former president and CEO of the international franchise restaurant Saladworks, has worked with hundreds of small business franchisees, many of whom have bad personal credit as a result of illness, divorce or other extenuating circumstances. “Sometimes, very good people, for reasons beyond their control, have credit issues,” Steck said. “And, unfortunately, that’s a real barrier to entry in the world of small business.” People with bad credit should consider nontraditional financing options — which tend to place less emphasis on credit scores — before giving up on getting a loan.

Limited cash flow Cash flow — a measure of how much cash you have on hand to pay back a loan — is usually the first thing lenders look at when gauging the health of your business. Insufficient cash flow is a flaw that most lenders can’t afford to overlook. Therefore, it’s the first thing business owners should consider when determining if they can afford a loan. “Really thinking through that cash-flow equation is like preventative medicine for your business,” said Jay DesMarteau, head of regional commercial specialty segments for TD Bank. “You can either wait until [your business] gets sick, or you can do things to prevent it from getting sick.” One of the preventative measures DesMarteau recommends is to calculate cash flow at least quarterly. If business owners take that step, they may be able to optimize their cash flow before approaching potential lenders.

Lacking a plan for the future Having a plan and sticking to it is much more attractive than spontaneity in the finance world.  “Banks require that business owners have an organized, detailed and quantitative business plan in order to move forward with the loan process,” said David Goldin, CEO, president and founder of Capify, an alternative small business lender. However, Goldin noted that it’s common for very small businesses to not have a formal business plan or any plan at all, for that matter. In these situations, he recommends that business owners at least forecast their future earnings before applying for a loan, so lenders will have an idea of your profitability. You should also be prepared to explain your plan for the money you want to borrow. “Lenders’ … biggest single complaint is that small business owners aren’t able to articulate very well how they’re going to use the capital that they’re looking for, how they’re going to make repayment and what impact they think [the loan] is going to have,” said Ty Kiisel, who writes about small business for online lender OnDeck. According to Kiisel, your pitch to lenders doesn’t need to be eloquent, but it must be straightforward. At the bare minimum, loan applicants should be prepared to explain why the want a loan and how they plan to repay it. 4. Disorganization When it comes to approaching potential lenders, business owners should have their act together. That means having all the paperwork you’ll need for your loan application on hand. “One of the things that can be a problem when applying for a loan is if [business owners] don’t have the documentation that the bank will require [such as] back tax returns,” Steck said.  There are plenty of resources that business owners can refer to when putting together their loan applications. The Small Business Administration, for example, provides a highly detailed loan application checklist for borrowers. Using these resources can decrease your likelihood of coming across as disorganized or unprepared.